Skip to site content

Lung Cancer Screening

Call 812-283-2405

Next Steps

Schedule a Lung Screening

Call 812-283-2405

What Are the Benefits and Risks of Screening?

The CT uses special X-ray technology to get images from different angles. Sophisticated computers process the information to produce multiple cross-sectional images of the inside of the body. Because an LDCT uses such a low dose of radiation, there is minimal risk of effects from radiation exposure.

Many people who have smoked have small nodules in their lungs. Usually, they're not lung cancer. If they appear abnormal, they may require additional testing, such as another CT or a biopsy to determine if cancer is present. An LDCT is a painless and non-invasive procedure that can find lung cancer when it's in early stages and very curable.

How Will the Scan Be Performed?

Lying flat on an exam table, you'll move slowly through the machine with your arms over your head. You'll hold your breath for about 5 to 10 seconds while the scan is being performed. That allows for a clearer image of your lungs. The entire exam should take around ten minutes.

What Happens After the Exam?

The radiologist will look at the results, put together a report discussing anything unusual that showed up in the images, and make recommendations for any follow-up care. The radiologist sends the report to the physician who referred you for the screening.

What if the Radiologist Detects Something?

If there's a nodule of concern, the radiologist will likely recommend a follow-up CT scan several months later to see if the nodule has changed. If you have an infection or inflammation in your lungs when you have the LDCT, you'll likely have a follow-up scan in about a month to make sure the issue went away and is not something else.

If there is a nodule that appears to be cancer, you may be referred to a pulmonologist (lung specialist) and have more testing, such as a PET scan.